Study shows air temperature influenced African glacial movements

Changes in air temperature, not precipitation, drove the expansion and contraction of glaciers in Africa’s Rwenzori Mountains at the height of the last ice age, according to a Dartmouth-led study funded by the National Geographic Society and the National Science Foundation.

The results – along with a recent Dartmouth-led study that found air temperature also likely influenced the fluctuating size of South America’s Quelccaya Ice Cap over the past millennium — support many scientists’ suspicions that today’s tropical glaciers are rapidly shrinking primarily because of a warming climate rather than declining snowfall or other factors. The two studies will help scientists to understand the natural variability of past climate and to predict tropical glaciers’ response to future global warming.

The most recent study, which marks the first time that scientists have used the beryllium-10 surface exposure dating method to chronicle the advance and retreat of Africa’s glaciers, appears in the journal Geology. A PDF is available on request.

Africa’s glaciers, which occur atop the world’s highest tropical mountains, are among the most sensitive components of the world’s frozen regions, but the climatic controls that influence their fluctuations are not fully understood. Dartmouth glacial geomorphologist Meredith Kelly and her team used the beryllium-10 method to determine the ages of quartz-rich boulders atop moraines in the Rwenzori Mountains on the border of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. These mountains have the most extensive glacial and moraine systems in Africa. Moraines are ridges of sediments that mark the past positions of glaciers.

The results indicate that glaciers in equatorial East Africa advanced between 24,000 and 20,000 years ago at the coldest time of the world’s last ice age. A comparison of the moraine ages with nearby climate records indicates that Rwenzori glaciers expanded contemporaneously with regionally dry, cold conditions and retreated when air temperature increased. The results suggest that, on millennial time scales, past fluctuations of Rwenzori glaciers were strongly influenced by air temperature.

New study determines more accurate method to date tropical glacier moraines

The Quelccaya Ice Cap, the world's largest tropical ice sheet, is rapidly melting. -  Meredith Kelly
The Quelccaya Ice Cap, the world’s largest tropical ice sheet, is rapidly melting. – Meredith Kelly

A Dartmouth-led team has found a more accurate method to determine the ages of boulders deposited by tropical glaciers, findings that will likely influence previous research of how climate change has impacted ice masses around the equator.

The study appears in the journal Quaternary Geochronology. A PDF of the study is available on request.

Scientists use a variety of dating methods to determine the ages of glacial moraines around the world, from the poles where glaciers are at sea level to the tropics where glaciers are high in the mountains. Moraines are sedimentary deposits that mark the past extents of glaciers. Since glaciers respond sensitively to climate, especially at high latitudes and high altitudes, the timing of glacial fluctuations marked by moraines can help scientists to better understand past climatic variations and how glaciers may respond to future changes.

In the tropics, glacial scientists commonly use beryllium-10 surface exposure dating. Beryllium-10 is an isotope of beryllium produced when cosmic rays strike bedrock that is exposed to air. Predictable rates of decay tell scientists how long ago the isotope was generated and suggest that the rock was covered in ice before then. Elevation, latitude and other factors affect the rate at which beryllium-10 is produced, but researchers typically use rates taken from calibration sites scattered around the globe rather than rates locally calibrated at the sites being studied.

The Dartmouth-led team looked at beryllium-10 concentrations in moraine boulders deposited by the Quelccaya Ice Cap, the largest ice mass in the tropics. Quelccaya, which sits 18,000 feet above sea level in the Peruvian Andes, has retreated significantly in recent decades. The researchers determined a new locally calibrated production rate that is at least 11 percent to 15 percent lower than the traditional global production rate.

“The use of our locally calibrated beryllium-10 production rate will change the surface exposure ages reported in previously published studies at low latitude, high altitude sites and may alter prior paleoclimate interpretations,” said Assistant Professor Meredith Kelly, the study’s lead author and a glacial geomorphologist at Dartmouth.

The new production rate yields beryllium-10 ages that are older than previously reported, which means the boulders were exposed for longer than previously estimated. Prior studies suggested glaciers in the Peruvian Andes advanced during early Holocene time 8,000 -10,000 years ago, a period thought to have been warm but perhaps wet in the Andes. But the new production rate pushes back the beryllium-10 ages to 11,000 -12,000 years ago when the tropics were cooler and drier. Also during this time, glaciers expanded in the northern hemisphere, which indicates a relationship between the climate mechanisms that caused cooling in the northern hemisphere and southern tropics.

The findings suggest the new production rate should be used to deliver more precise ages of moraines in low-latitude, high-altitude locations, particularly in the tropical Andes. Such precision can help scientists to more accurately reconstruct past glacial and climatic variations, Kelly said.

Landslide buries climate change link





The dark curvy ridge running across the picture is the Waiho Loop moraine, dated to originate from the Younger Dryas cold event
The dark curvy ridge running across the picture is the Waiho Loop moraine, dated to originate from the Younger Dryas cold event

New findings by three University of Canterbury researchers could pour cold water on evidence that climate change is happening simultaneously around the world.



The discovery has been made as a result of a study of the Waiho Loop glacial moraine on the plain between Franz Josef township and the sea, and is described by co-author Professor Jamie Shulmeister as throwing “a cat among the paleoclimate pigeons”.



A moraine is a ridge which marks the end of an earlier glacier limit. Scientists have believed the Waiho Loop moraine was created during a brief cold snap about 13,000 years ago that also affected Europe and North America, and inspired the Hollywood blockbuster movie The Day After Tomorrow.



The Waiho Loop moraine is widely used as evidence for direct inter-hemispheric linkage in climate change. But these new findings suggest the loop – which sits near the South Island’s Alpine fault line – was the result of a landslide, not climate change.


Professor Shulmeister, who worked on the research with Associate Professor Tim Davies and honours student Daniel Tovar, says there has been a huge scientific debate on the climatic implications of the Waiho Loop. But no one had ever studied its sediments.



“When graduate student Dan Tovar had a look he discovered to our surprise that it was mainly made up of a rock type known as greywacke which is different to the rocks that make up all the other moraines in front of the Franz Josef glacier.



“This rock type occurs about 13 kilometres up the valley from the Loop. All the other moraines are predominantly composed of schist which outcrops near Franz Josef township. The greywacke was also rather more angular than the rocks in the other moraines, suggesting it had not been transported in water or at the base of a glacier.”



As a result of its findings, Professor Shulmeister’s team believes a large landslide dumped a huge volume of rock on top of the glacier causing it to advance and, when the advance stopped, the moraine was created.



The findings will be published this week in the prestigious international science journal, Nature Geoscience.