Researcher receives $1.2 million to create real-time seismic imaging system

This is Dr. WenZhan Song. -  Georgia State University
This is Dr. WenZhan Song. – Georgia State University

Dr. WenZhan Song, a professor in the Department of Computer Science at Georgia State University, has received a four-year, $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation to create a real-time seismic imaging system using ambient noise.

This imaging system for shallow earth structures could be used to study and monitor the sustainability of the subsurface, or area below the surface, and potential hazards of geological structures. Song and his collaborators, Yao Xie of the Georgia Institute of Technology and Fan-Chi Lin of the University of Utah, will use ambient noise to image the subsurface of geysers in Yellowstone National Park.

“This project is basically imaging what’s underground in a situation where there’s no active source, like an earthquake. We’re using background noise,” Song said. “At Yellowstone, for instance, people visit there and cars drive by. All that could generate signals that are penetrating through the ground. We essentially use that type of information to tap into a very weak signal to infer the image of underground. This is very frontier technology today.”

The system will be made up of a large network of wireless sensors that can perform in-network computing of 3-D images of the shallow earth structure that are based solely on ambient noise.

Real-time ambient noise seismic imaging technology could also inform homeowners if the subsurface below their home, which can change over time, is stable or will sink beneath them.

This technology can also be used in circumstances that don’t need to rely on ambient noise but have an active source that produces signals that can be detected by wireless sensors. It could be used for real-time monitoring and developing early warning systems for natural hazards, such as volcanoes, by determining how close magma is to the surface. It could also benefit oil exploration, which uses methods such as hydrofracturing, in which high-pressure water breaks rocks and allows natural gas to flow more freely from underground.

“As they do that, it’s critical to monitor that in real time so you can know what’s going on under the ground and not cause damage,” Song said. “It’s a very promising technology, and we’re helping this industry reduce costs significantly because previously they only knew what was going on under the subsurface many days and even months later. We could reduce this to seconds.”

Until now, data from oil exploration instruments had to be manually retrieved and uploaded into a centralized database, and it could take days or months to process and analyze the data.

The research team plans to have a field demonstration of the system in Yellowstone and image the subsurface of some of the park’s geysers. The results will be shared with Yellowstone management, rangers and staff. Yellowstone, a popular tourist attraction, is a big volcano that has been dormant for a long time, but scientists are concerned it could one day pose potential hazards.

In the past several years, Song has been developing a Real-time In-situ Seismic Imaging (RISI) system using active sources, under the support of another $1.8 million NSF grant. His lab has built a RISI system prototype that is ready for deployment. The RISI system can be implemented as a general field instrumentation platform for various geophysical imaging applications and incorporate new geophysical data processing and imaging algorithms.

The RISI system can be applied to a wide range of geophysical exploration topics, such as hydrothermal circulation, oil exploration, mining safety and mining resource monitoring, to monitor the uncertainty inherent to the exploration and production process, reduce operation costs and mitigate the environmental risks. The business and social impact is broad and significant. Song is seeking business investors and partners to commercialize this technology.

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For more information about the project, visit http://sensorweb.cs.gsu.edu/?q=ANSI.

The bend in the Appalachian mountain chain is finally explained

A dense, underground block of volcanic rock (shown in red) helped shape the well-known bend in the Appalachian mountain range. -  Graphic by Michael Osadciw/University of Rochester.
A dense, underground block of volcanic rock (shown in red) helped shape the well-known bend in the Appalachian mountain range. – Graphic by Michael Osadciw/University of Rochester.

The 1500 mile Appalachian mountain chain runs along a nearly straight line from Alabama to Newfoundland-except for a curious bend in Pennsylvania and New York State. Researchers from the College of New Jersey and the University of Rochester now know what caused that bend-a dense, underground block of rigid, volcanic rock forced the chain to shift eastward as it was forming millions of years ago.

According to Cindy Ebinger, a professor of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Rochester, scientists had previously known about the volcanic rock structure under the Appalachians. “What we didn’t understand was the size of the structure or its implications for mountain-building processes,” she said.

The findings have been published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters.

When the North American and African continental plates collided more than 300 million years ago, the North American plate began folding and thrusting upwards as it was pushed westward into the dense underground rock structure-in what is now the northeastern United States. The dense rock created a barricade, forcing the Appalachian mountain range to spring up with its characteristic bend.

The research team-which also included Margaret Benoit, an associate professor of physics at the College of New Jersey, and graduate student Melanie Crampton at the College of New Jersey-studied data collected by the Earthscope project, which is funded by the National Science Foundation. Earthscope makes use of 136 GPS receivers and an array of 400 portable seismometers deployed in the northeast United States to measure ground movement.

Benoit and Ebinger also made use of the North American Gravity Database, a compilation of open-source data from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. The database, started two decades ago, contains measurements of the gravitational pull over the North American terrain. Most people assume that gravity has a constant value, but when gravity is experimentally measured, it changes from place to place due to variations in the density and thickness of Earth’s rock layers. Certain parts of the Earth are denser than others, causing the gravitational pull to be slightly greater in those places.

Data on the changes in gravitational pull and seismic velocity together allowed the researchers to determine the density of the underground structure and conclude that it is volcanic in origin, with dimensions of 450 kilometers by 100 kilometers. This information, along with data from the Earthscope project ultimately helped the researchers to model how the bend was formed.

Ebinger called the research project a “foundation study” that will improve scientists’ understanding of the Earth’s underlying structures. As an example, Ebinger said their findings could provide useful information in the debate over hydraulic fracturing-popularly known is hydrofracking-in New York State.

Hydrofracking is a mining technique used to extract natural gas from deep in the earth. It involves drilling horizontally into shale formations, then injecting the rock with sand, water, and a cocktail of chemicals to free the trapped gas for removal. The region just west of the Appalachian Basin-the Marcellus Shale formation-is rich in natural gas reserves and is being considered for development by drilling companies.

Gas-charged fluids creating seismicity associated with a Louisiana sinkhole

Natural earthquakes and nuclear explosions produce seismic waves that register on seismic monitoring networks around the globe, allowing the scientific community to pinpoint the location of the events. In order to distinguish seismic waves produced by a variety of activities – from traffic to mining to explosions – scientists study the seismic waves generated by as many types of events as possible.

In August 2012, the emergence of a very large sinkhole at the Napoleonville Salt Dome in Louisiana offered University of California, Berkeley scientists the opportunity to detect, locate and analyze a rich sequence of 62 seismic events that occurred one day prior to its discovery.

In June 2012, residents of Bayou Corne reported frequent tremors and unusual gas bubbling in local surface water. The U.S. Geological Survey installed a temporary network of seismic stations, and on August 3, a large sinkhole was discovered close to the western edge of the salt dome.

In this study published by the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA), co-authors Douglas Dreger and Avinash Nayak, evaluated the data recorded by the seismic network during the 24 hours prior to the discovery of the sinkhole. They implemented a waveform scanning approach to continuously detect, locate and analyze the source of the seismic events at the sinkhole, which are located to the edge of the salt dome and above and to the west of the cavern near the sinkhole.

The point-source equivalent force system describing the motions at the seismic source (called moment tensor) showed similarities to seismic events produced by explosions and active geothermal and volcanic environments. But at the sinkhole, an influx of natural gas rather than hot magma may be responsible for elevating the pore pressure enough to destabilize pre-existing zones of weakness, such as fractures or faults at the edge of the salt dome.

New hi-tech approach to studying sedimentary basins

A radical new approach to analysing sedimentary basins also harnesses technology in a completely novel way. An international research group, led by the University of Sydney, will use big data sets and exponentially increased computing power to model the interaction between processes on the earth’s surface and deep below it in ‘five dimensions’.

As announced by the Federal Minister for Education today, the University’s School of Geosciences will lead the Basin GENESIS Hub that has received $5.4 million over five years from the Australian Research Council (ARC) and industry partners.

The multitude of resources found in sedimentary basins includes groundwater and energy resources. The space between grains of sand in these basins can also be used to store carbon dioxide.

“This research will be of fundamental importance to both the geo-software industry, used by exploration and mining companies, and to other areas of the energy industry,” said Professor Dietmar Müller, Director of the Hub, from the School of Geosciences.

“The outcomes will be especially important for identifying exploration targets in deep basins in remote regions of Australia. It will create a new ‘exploration geodynamics’ toolbox for industry to improve estimates of what resources might be found in individual basins.”

Sedimentary basins form when sediments eroded from highly elevated regions are transported through river systems and deposited into lowland regions and continental margins. The Sydney Basin is a massive basin filled mostly with river sediments that form Hawkesbury sandstone. It is invisible to the Sydney population living above it but has provided building material for many decades.

“Previously the approach to analysing these basins has been based on interpreting geological data and two-dimensional models. We apply infinitely more computing power to enhance our understanding of sedimentary basins as the product of the complex interplay between surface and deep Earth processes,” said Professor Müller.

Associate Professor Rey, a researcher at the School of Geosciences and member of the Hub said, “Our new approach is to understand the formation of sedimentary basins and the changes they undergo, both recently and over millions to hundreds of millions of years, using computer simulations to incorporate information such as the evolution of erosion, sedimentary processes and the deformation of the earth’s crust.”

The researchers will incorporate data from multiple sources to create ‘five-dimensional’ models, combining three-dimensional space with the extra dimensions of time and estimates of uncertainty.

The modelling will span scales from entire basins hundreds of kilometres wide to individual sediment grains.

Key geographical areas the research will focus on are the North-West shelf of Australia, Papua New Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean continental margins.

The Hub’s technology builds upon the exponential increase in computational power and the increasing amount of available big data (massive data sets of information). The Hub will harness the capacity of Australia’s most powerful computer, launched in 2013.

Aiming to improve the air quality in underground mines

Reducing diesel particulate matter emitted by the diesel powered vehicles used for underground mine work is the aim of researchers from Monash University. -  Monash University
Reducing diesel particulate matter emitted by the diesel powered vehicles used for underground mine work is the aim of researchers from Monash University. – Monash University

Reducing diesel particulate matter (DPM) exposure to miners in underground coalmines will be a step closer to reality with the awarding of a research grant to engineers from Monash University.

The $275,000 grant from the Australian Coal Association Research Programme (ACARP) goes to a multi-disciplinary team from the Maintenance Technology Institute (MTI), the Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion (LTRAC) and the Australian Pulp and Paper Institute (APPI).

The grant will allow them to collaborate with leading industry original equipment manufacturers and mine site personnel as part of a broader long-term strategy to minimise DPM emissions in the mining industry.

Joint project leader Associate Professor Damon Honnery said it was important to find a way to reduce miners exposure to DPM which is both effective and cost efficient.

“DPM has recently been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen by the World Health Organisation, and is a significant problem for operators of underground coalmines,” Associate Professor Honnery said.

“Diesel powered vehicles are widely used for underground mine work and are generally fitted with diesel particulate filters (DPFs) to reduce particulate emissions which have very limited service life – typically around one or two shifts – resulting in excessive costs and ineffective control of DPM.”

The new project will complement an earlier ACARP project by the team that focussed on improving the service life of DPFs used in underground coalmines, which found reconditioned filters could be reused up to five times without compromising filter integrity or DPM filtration efficiency.

Fellow Project leader Dr Daya Dayawansa said while the earlier results offer a viable short-term solution to the DPM problem, a medium-term solution requires the careful examination and possible redesign of the entire exhaust conditioning system, in combination with improved diesel particulate filters.

Ultimately, the researchers believe that many diesel engines used in underground mining could be replaced by electric motors, despite the stringent regulations relating to electric systems in the potentially explosive underground atmosphere.

“While filter use will continue to reduce the impact of DPM emission in underground mines, the only truly effective long term solution is to remove the source from the mines altogether. Working with our partners, we hope to achieve this through the development of electric powered vehicles,” Dr Dayawansa said.

How productive are the ore factories in the deep sea?

About ten years after the first moon landing, scientists on earth made a discovery that proved that our home planet still holds a lot of surprises in store for us. Looking through the portholes of the submersible ALVIN near the bottom of the Pacific Ocean in 1979, American scientists saw for the first time chimneys, several meters tall, from which black water at about 300 degrees and saturated with minerals shot out. What we have found out since then: These “black smokers”, also called hydrothermal vents, exist in all oceans. They occur along the boundaries of tectonic plates along the submarine volcanic chains. However, to date many details of these systems remain unexplained.

One question that has long and intensively been discussed in research is: Where and how deep does seawater penetrate into the seafloor to take up heat and minerals before it leaves the ocean floor at hydrothermal vents? This is of enormous importance for both, the cooling of the underwater volcanoes as well as for the amount of materials dissolved. Using a complex 3-D computer model, scientists at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel were now able to understand the paths of the water toward the black smokers. The study appears in the current issue of the world-renowned scientific journal “Nature“.

In general, it is well known that seawater penetrates into the Earth’s interior through cracks and crevices along the plate boundaries. The seawater is heated by the magma; the hot water rises again, leaches metals and other elements from the ground and is released as a black colored solution. “However, in detail it is somewhat unclear whether the water enters the ocean floor in the immediate vicinity of the vents and flows upward immediately, or whether it travels long distances underground before venting,” explains Dr. Jörg Hasenclever from GEOMAR.

This question is not only important for the fundamental understanding of processes on our planet. It also has very practical implications. Some of the materials leached from the underground are deposited on the seabed and form ore deposits that may be of economically interest. There is a major debate, however, how large the resource potential of these deposits might be. “When we know which paths the water travels underground, we can better estimate the quantities of materials released by black smokers over thousands of years,” says Hasenclever.

Hasenclever and his colleagues have used for the first time a high-resolution computer model of the seafloor to simulate a six kilometer long and deep, and 16 kilometer wide section of a mid-ocean ridge in the Pacific. Among the data used by the model was the heat distribution in the oceanic crust, which is known from seismic studies. In addition, the model also considered the permeability of the rock and the special physical properties of water.

The simulation required several weeks of computing time. The result: “There are actually two different flow paths – about half the water seeps in near the vents, where the ground is very warm. The other half seeps in at greater distances and migrates for kilometers through the seafloor before exiting years later.” Thus, the current study partially confirmed results from a computer model, which were published in 2008 in the scientific journal “Science”. “However, the colleagues back then were able to simulate only a much smaller region of the ocean floor and therefore identified only the short paths near the black smokers,” says Hasenclever.

The current study is based on fundamental work on the modeling of the seafloor, which was conducted in the group of Professor Lars Rüpke within the framework of the Kiel Cluster of Excellence “The Future Ocean”. It provides scientists worldwide with the basis for further investigations to see how much ore is actually on and in the seabed, and whether or not deep-sea mining on a large scale could ever become worthwhile. “So far, we only know the surface of the ore deposits at hydrothermal vents. Nobody knows exactly how much metal is really deposited there. All the discussions about the pros and cons of deep-sea ore mining are based on a very thin database,” says co-author Prof. Dr. Colin Devey from GEOMAR. “We need to collect a lot more data on hydrothermal systems before we can make reliable statements”.

Urbanization exposes French cities to greater seismic risk

French researchers have looked into data mining to develop a method for extracting information on the vulnerability of cities in regions of moderate risk, creating a proxy for assessing the probable resilience of buildings and infrastructure despite incomplete seismic inventories of buildings. The research exposes significant vulnerability in regions that have experienced an “explosion of urbanization.”

“Considering that the seismic hazard is stable in time, we observe that the seismic risk comes from the rapid development of urbanization, which places at the same site goods and people exposed to hazard” said Philippe Gueguen, co-author and senior researcher at Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, France. The paper appears today in the journal Seismological Research Letters (SRL).

Local authorities rely on seismic vulnerability assessments to estimate the probable damage on an overall scale (such as a country, region or town) and identify the most vulnerable building categories that need reinforcement. These assessments are costly and require detailed understanding of how buildings will respond to ground motion.

Old structures, designed before current seismic building codes, abound in France, and there is insufficient information about how they will respond during an earthquake, say authors. The last major earthquake in France, which is considered to have moderate seismic hazard, was the 1909 magnitude 6 Lambesc earthquake, which killed 42 people and caused millions of euros of losses in the southeastern region.

The authors relied on the French national census for basic descriptions of buildings in Grenoble, a city of moderate seismic hazard, to create a vulnerability proxy, which they validated in Nice and later tested for the historic Lambesc earthquake.

The research exposed the effects of the urbanization and urban concentrations in areas prone to seismic hazard.

“In seismicity regions similar to France, seismic events are rare and are of low probability. With urbanization, the consequences of characteristic events, such as Lambesc, can be significant in terms of structural damage and fatalities,” said Gueguen. “These consequences are all the more significant because of the moderate seismicity that reduces the perception of risk by local authorities.”

If the 1909 Lambesc earthquake were to happen now, write the authors, the region would suffer serious consequences, including damage to more than 15,000 buildings. They equate the likely devastation to that observed after recent earthquakes of similar sizes in L’Aquila, Italy and Christchurch, New Zealand.

Maize and bacteria: A 1-2 punch knocks copper out of stamp sand

Maize plants grown in stamp sand inoculated with bacteria, left, were considerably more robust than those grown in stamp sand alone, right. Research led by Michigan Technological University's Ramakrishna Wusirika could lead to new remediation techniques for soils contaminated by copper and other heavy metals. -  Ramakrishna Wusirika
Maize plants grown in stamp sand inoculated with bacteria, left, were considerably more robust than those grown in stamp sand alone, right. Research led by Michigan Technological University’s Ramakrishna Wusirika could lead to new remediation techniques for soils contaminated by copper and other heavy metals. – Ramakrishna Wusirika

Scientists have known for years that together, bacteria and plants can remediate contaminated sites. Ramakrishna Wusirika, of Michigan Technological University, has determined that how you add bacteria to the mix can make a big difference.

He has also shed light on the biochemical pathways that allow plants and bacteria to clean up some of the worst soils on the planet while increasing their fertility.

Wusirika, an associate professor of biological sciences, first collected stamp sands near the village of Gay, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. For decades, copper mining companies crushed copper ore and dumped the remnants-an estimated 500 million tons of stamp sand-throughout the region. Almost nothing grows on these manmade deserts, which are laced with high concentrations of copper, arsenic and other plant-unfriendly chemicals.

Then, Wusirika and his team planted maize in the stamp sand, incorporating bacteria in four different ways:

  • mixing it in the stamp sand before planting seed;

  • coating seed with bacteria and planting it;

  • germinating seeds and planting them in soil to which bacteria were added; and

  • the conventional method, immersing the roots of maize seedlings in bacteria and planting them in stamp sand.

After 45 days, the team uprooted the plants and measured their dry weight. All maize grown with bacteria was significantly more vigorous-from two to five times larger-than the maize grown in stamp sand alone. The biggest were those planted as seedlings or as germinated seeds.

However, when the researchers analyzed the dried maize, they made a surprising discovery: the seed-planted maize took up far more copper as a percentage of dry weight. In other words, the smaller plants pulled more copper, ounce per ounce, out of the stamp sands than the bigger ones.

That has implications for land managers trying to remediate contaminated sites, or even for farmers working with marginal soils, Wusirika said. The usual technique-applying bacteria to seedlings’ roots before transplanting-works fine in the lab but would be impractical for large-scale projects. This could open the door to simple, practical remediation of copper-contaminated soils.

But the mere fact that all the plants grown with bacteria did so well also piqued his curiosity. “When we saw this, we wondered what the bacteria were doing to the soil,” Wusirika said. “Based on our research, it looks like they are improving enzyme activity and increasing soil fertility,” in part by freeing up phosphorus that had been locked in the rock.

The bacteria are also changing copper into a form that the plants can take up. “With bacteria, the exchangeable copper is increased three times,” he said. “There’s still a lot of copper that’s not available, but it is moving in the right direction.”

By analyzing metabolic compounds, the team was able to show that the bacteria enhance photosynthesis and help the plants make growth hormones. Bacteria also appear to affect the amount phenolics produced by the maize. Phenolics are antioxidants similar to those in grapes and red wine.

Compared to plants grown in normal soil without bacteria, plants grown in stamp sand alone showed a five-fold increase in phenolics. However, phenolics in plants grown in stamp sand with bacteria showed a lesser increase.

“Growing in stamp sand is very stressful for plants, and they respond by increasing their antioxidant production,” Wusirika said. “Adding the metal-resistant bacteria enables the plants to cope with stress better, resulting in reduced levels of phenolics.”

“There’s still a lot to understand here,” he added. “We’d like to do a study on stamp sands in the field, and we’d also like to work with plants besides maize. We think this work has applications in organic agriculture as well as remediation.”

Innovative handheld mineral analyzer — ‘the first of its kind’

This is Dr. Graeme Hansford of the University of Leicester Space Research Centre. -  University of Leicester
This is Dr. Graeme Hansford of the University of Leicester Space Research Centre. – University of Leicester

Dr Graeme Hansford from the University of Leicester’s Space Research Centre (SRC) has recently started a collaborative project with Bruker Elemental to develop a handheld mineral analyser for mining applications – the first of its kind.

The analyser will allow rapid mineral identification and quantification in the field through a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The novel X-ray diffraction method was invented at the University of Leicester and has been developed at the Space Research Centre. The addition of XRD capability represents an evolution of current handheld XRF instruments which sell 1000s of units each year globally.

The handheld instrument is expected to weigh just 1.5 kg, will be capable of analysing mining samples for mineral content within 1 – 2 minutes, and requires no sample preparation. This would be a world first. The analyser is unique due to the insensitivity of the technique to the shape of the sample, which enables the direct analysis of samples without any form of preparation – something currently inconceivable using conventional XRD equipment.

Dr Hansford said: “It’s very fulfilling for me to see the development of this novel XRD technique from initial conception through theoretical calculations and modelling to experimental demonstration.

“The next step is to develop the commercial potential and I’m very excited to be working with Bruker Elemental on the development of a handheld instrument.”

Bruker Elemental is a global leader in handheld XRF instrumentation, with the mining sector a key customer. Bruker therefore brings essential commercial expertise to the project. The two partners have complementary expertise, and are uniquely placed to successfully deliver this knowledge exchange project.

Alexander Seyfarth, senior product manager at Bruker Elemental, said: “Bruker is excited to be involved in this project as it will bring new measurement capabilities to our handheld equipment. In many cases this system will provide information on the crystallography of the sample in addition to the elemental analysis.”

Dr Hansford originally conceived of the XRD technique in early 2010, when trying to work out how to apply XRD for space applications – for example on the surface of Mars or an asteroid – without the need for any sample preparation.

The next stage of the project will focus on developing and testing the methodology using samples which are representative of real-world problems encountered in mining, such as determining the relative amounts of iron oxide minerals in ore samples. In the second part of the project, a prototype handheld device will be developed at the SRC in conjunction with Bruker to demonstrate efficacy of the technology in the field. A key advantage is that the hardware requirements of the technique are very similar to existing handheld XRF devices, facilitating both rapid development and customer acceptance.

Acid mine drainage reduces radioactivity in fracking waste

Much of the naturally occurring radioactivity in fracking wastewater might be removed by blending it with another wastewater from acid mine drainage, according to a Duke University-led study.

“Fracking wastewater and acid mine drainage each pose well-documented environmental and public health risks. But in laboratory tests, we found that by blending them in the right proportions we can bind some of the fracking contaminants into solids that can be removed before the water is discharged back into streams and rivers,” said Avner Vengosh, professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment.

“This could be an effective way to treat Marcellus Shale hydraulic fracturing wastewater, while providing a beneficial use for acid mine drainage that currently is contaminating waterways in much of the northeastern United States,” Vengosh said. “It’s a win-win for the industry and the environment.”

Blending fracking wastewater with acid mine drainage also could help reduce the depletion of local freshwater resources by giving drillers a source of usable recycled water for the hydraulic fracturing process, he added.

“Scarcity of fresh water in dry regions or during periods of drought can severely limit shale gas development in many areas of the United States and in other regions of the world where fracking is about to begin,” Vengosh said. “Using acid mine drainage or other sources of recycled or marginal water may help solve this problem and prevent freshwater depletion.”

The peer-reviewed study was published in late December 2013 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

In hydraulic fracturing – or fracking, as it is sometimes called – millions of tons of water are injected at high pressure down wells to crack open shale deposits buried deep underground and extract natural gas trapped within the rock. Some of the water flows back up through the well, along with natural brines and the natural gas. This “flowback fluid” typically contains high levels of salts, naturally occurring radioactive materials such as radium, and metals such as barium and strontium.

A study last year by the Duke team showed that standard treatment processes only partially remove these potentially harmful contaminants from Marcellus Shale wastewater before it is discharged back into streams and waterways, causing radioactivity to accumulate in stream sediments near the disposal site.

Acid mine drainage flows out of abandoned coal mines into many streams in the Appalachian Basin. It can be highly toxic to animals, plants and humans, and affects the quality of hundreds of waterways in Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Because much of the current Marcellus shale gas development is taking place in regions where large amounts of historic coal mining occurred, some experts have suggested that acid mine drainage could be used to frack shale gas wells in place of fresh water.

To test that hypothesis, Vengosh and his team blended different mixtures of Marcellus Shale fracking wastewater and acid mine drainage, all of which were collected from sites in western Pennsylvania and provided to the scientists by the industry.

After 48 hours, the scientists examined the chemical and radiological contents of 26 different mixtures. Geochemical modeling was used to simulate the chemical and physical reactions that had occurred after the blending; the results of the modeling were then verified using x-ray diffraction and by measuring the radioactivity of the newly formed solids.

“Our analysis suggested that several ions, including sulfate, iron, barium and strontium, as well as between 60 and 100 percent of the radium, had precipitated within the first 10 hours into newly formed solids composed mainly of strontium barite,” Vengosh said. These radioactive solids could be removed from the mixtures and safely disposed of at licensed hazardous-waste facilities, he said. The overall salinity of the blended fluids was also reduced, making the treated water suitable for re-use at fracking sites.

“The next step is to test this in the field. While our laboratory tests show that is it technically possible to generate recycled, treated water suitable for hydraulic fracturing, field-scale tests are still necessary to confirm its feasibility under operational conditions,” Vengosh said.